Posts Tagged ‘blog: interviews’.

Check out: Podcast interview on ‘Comics Manifest’

SO MOTIVATIONAL

I just linked to an interview I did for a podcast! Now here’s ANOTHER ONE!

It’s called Comics Manifest, and it is about giving inspiration to and sharing war stories with creative people:

Comics Manifest is a podcast that interviews amazing and influential creators in comics. Guests share their creative journey, express what excites them today, share their worst creative moment and most memorable successes. The show aims to inspire, giving you the insight and inspiration to take your comics projects to the next level.

Did I tell some of the same stories as the last podcast? Only if they asked the same questions!!

Comics Manifest Episode 64 : David Malki ! ]

 

Check out: Podcast interview for ‘The Art of Engineering’

I made that tower, I designed it

“This podcast series explores the evolution of a career in engineering, the overlap of art & engineering, and also promotes engineering outreach and STEM / STEAM in schools.”

Recently, I was pleased to chat with Chad Harden for his podcast “The Art of Engineering.” We had a lovely talk about my background, how I got into this weird job that I have, whether I am actually an engineer (no) and many other things!

The podcast episode is here!


OBLIGATORY REMINDER:

The 2017 Wondermark Calendar is on Kickstarter this year, and the campaign closes next week, Tuesday, December 6! (I have to cut it off kinda early so I can get all the shipping and everything sorted in time.)

I’d really like to hit 250 backers (which is as many calendars as I’ve produced the last few years), and we’re about on pace for that, with a few days left to go! If you are interested in getting a copy of this year’s calendar, you have until Tuesday to back on Kickstarter.

Fork you very much

My Interview With the Inventor of the Coloring Book

actual photo

As is well known, I both (a) have an interest in things that are old, and (b) am currently promoting a Kickstarter, active right now, for my Roll-a-Sketch coloring book.

Thus, I thought it would be enlightening to speak with Col. (Ret.) Mirithus F. Coloring (b.1851), inventor of the coloring book.

Our interview took place at the Colonel’s residence.

MALKI: Colonel, you have been called both “the father of crayon-art” and also, by some, “an abomination; a scourge on the house-hold and a fiend from the Pit.” Why such a dramatic response?

COL. COLORING: Well, first I should make quite clear that any moniker regarding “crayon-art” has been fiercely opposed by Professor Crayola and his band of toughs. I have never, and certainly do not now, proscribe any implement in particular for use in my books, or recommend one over any other.

It’s just that children most often turn to crayons to fill your books.

Such has been alleged, but I have never marketed a single pamphlet as a “crayon-book.” Adults tend to use tinted pencils, I should add, and there are many more adults in the world than children.

What about the more vitriolic opinions of your work?

You must realize that when my books first began to circulate, it was a different time. Most books in the home were farming ledgers or family Bibles. The prospect of a book with no useful information in it — much less one most often perused by children, already the most useless members of the family? Mothers claimed it encouraged idleness and fancy, and fathers charged it was merely a scheme to sell penny chromo-chalks and watercolours.

Which did sell quite well, I should add.

You shouldn’t add any such thing. I never saw a nickel from the sale of any chromo-chalk; that was all my brother’s doing, capitalising on our distinctive family name. Besides, all courts have cleared me of any liability for any lung ailments they may have caused, and my brother, as you know, was lost at sea.

Last seen on a wax-freighter bound for Crete, I recall?

Yes. Ask Professor Crayola where that boat wound up.

I’d be afraid for my safety if I did. But back to the books: eventually the vitriol faded. What changed?

The old generation died off! Children who’d grown up with my books recalled them fondly when they had children of their own, and of course those who had suffered any ill effects from the chalk or anything else never survived to the age of reproduction! It was a win-win scenario.

Did you ever fear that your books were, indeed, a bad influence on children?

Pish-tosh and bubble-gum! Everything is a bad influence on children: dogs fouling in the road, or the banker’s heavy hand on the door, or the Congressional Record. My books contained nothing worse than anything a child would see in ten minutes at a rodeo.

Some would say that the generations that have grown up since the introduction of the Coloring-Book have forgotten how to respect their elders.

Any child in history that ever respected an elder is a child that ought to be reported to the authorities as a fraud.

You know, I presume, that I have a (duly licensed) coloring book project of my own, currently available. Any advice for a new entrant in the field?

Get out while you still can.


Wondermark thanks Col. Coloring for his candid answers.

Also available in the Kickstarter: Paintings from the Roll-a-Sketch Yearbook! There are six days left in the campaign!!

ROLL IT UP (don't actually do this)

Interview at The Setup: The Stuff I Use

it's-a me

I was interviewed by the site The Setup! It was pretty fun. The premise of the site is asking people “what do you use?” Hardware, software, processes, etc.

I’ll also list mental processes under “software”. All the apps and tricks in the world are just cargo cult trappings if you can’t control the way you think. This is really hard for me! And it’s an ongoing learning process as I struggle to navigate the canyons that streams of habit have carved into the workings of my mind. But the few things I’ve found that work really well (when I can stick to them) are…

Read the whole interview at The Setup!

This weekend! San Francisco!

I am positively glommuxed to be visiting San Francisco this weekend! I’ll be at the Bazaar Bizarre craft fair, held at Fort Mason, this coming Saturday & Sunday.

I’ve been to a BazBiz event once before, at Maker Faire earlier this spring, and I was absolutely glommuxed by the wonderful crowd and the kind response to my wares. I’ll be bringing Monocle Poppers holiday cards, as well as the usual complement of books, shirts, posters &c., so be sure to stop by and say hello!

Also here is a brief interview I gave to the BazBizBlog:

…My list of things to do grows faster than my list of things done, which someday will be a problem and I will be crushed by teetering, top-heavy stack of projects full of pointy ideas and deadly ambitions.

If I don’t see you there I will become fiercely and violently glommuxed